Writing Video Scripts and Teleprompter

Over the years we have found that scripts are an essential component of a successful course video. This page will walk you through some of reasoning behind using scripts, writing tips, and some examples.

Script vs Outline

First, let’s define what a script is and the best way to do that is to contrast it against what it is not.

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Script

A script is a written document that is word-for-word what you will say. We project it onto a teleprompter which allows you to keep eye contact with the camera throughout your video.

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Outline

An outline is a collection of high level talking points that you use as a guide and expand upon during recording. They are not put onto the teleprompter. Instead they are usually in paper form and held during the video for reference.

 

Why Use a Script

Benefits
Precision

Writing your content out ahead of time assures that you will cover all the necessary information and won’t miss anything.

Concise

In our experience, unscripted videos are always more verbose than had they been scripted. Scripting will help you get through all your talking points more concisely.

Evergreen

Depending on your program, course video content is updated every 2-5 yrs so we need video content to last that long. The script writing process helps to avoid stating any content that could date your video or you may want to change in the near future.

Feedback

Having your video down on paper before the shoot enables us to review your content and provide helpful feedback.

Easier Shoot Day

Finally, it makes for an easier and less stressful shoot day. Leveraging scripts and a teleprompter will free you up from having to focus on remembering all your talking points. Instead we can focus all your energy to your performance in front of the camera (tone, inflection, hand gestures, body movement, etc). We will help coach you on this during your shoot.

 

Writing Tips and Requirements

Tips
Read It Out loud

The written and spoken word flow differently. Read your script out loud as you write it to make sure that it flows well for you when spoken out loud.

Keep it Green

Be careful not to include anything that will instantly date your video or could change in the future. Avoid getting too specific with things like assessments as you may change them in the future. It is better to stay broad and high-level with things that could change.

Content

The what is an important component of your video, but what is of equal importance is the why. First, it is why I am creating this video? What is the need or purpose? Next why is this topic important? How does it relate to other parts of the course, the program as a whole or real world scenarios?

Length

A common question is “How long should my videos be?” and unfortunately there is no easy answer to this question. Instead, focus on what does and does not need to be covered in your video. During the writing process never forget why you are creating your video. What purpose does it serve in the overall course? This thought process will help to answer this question. With that said, for reference – one page, single spaced, size 12 font of standard font type roughly equates to 5 minutes in video time.

Requirements
Delivery

Your script must be submitted no later than 1 week before your shoot date. This allows enough time for your script to be reviewed and feedback to be provided before the day of your shoot.

 

Examples

Here are some examples from our faculty showcase

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Meet the Instructor
Rich Freese

Watch Script

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Meet the Instructor
Vallari Chandna

Watch Script

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Meet the Instructor
Alyson Haugen

Watch Script

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Course Introduction
HIMT440

Watch Script

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Course Introduction
HIMT370
Watch Script

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Course Introduction
HWM710

Watch Script

 

Published on October 23, 2018 at 9:59:09 am CDT. Last modified on July 02, 2019 at 8:51:56 am CDT.